AUSTRALASIAN PENTECOSTAL STUDIES CENTRE LAUNCH

The Australasian Pentecostal Studies Centre (APSC) was officially launched, on 6th July 2015, by Rev Dr Andrew Evans, former General Superintendent of the Assemblies of God in Australia and former Member of the Legislative Council in South Australia. The APS Centre recently received a Community Heritage Grant funded by the Australian Government and managed by the National Library of Australia in recognition of the national significance of the collection. This grant included a one-day Heritage Workshop and two-day Significance Assessment of the APS Centre collection by Dr Roslyn Russell.

We were honoured to have with at the launch many special guests, including: Dr Geoffrey Lee, State Member for Parramatta; Councilor Andrew Wilson, Parramatta City Council; Dr Mark Robinson, State Member for Cleveland in Queensland and Rev Dr Harold Hunter, Director of the International Pentecostal Holiness Church Archives and Research Center in Oklahoma.

Heritage Training Workshop (6th July 2015: 10am-5pm)

It was great to have 43 people in attendance at the one-day Heritage Training Workshop, including AC staff, students, alumni, community group representatives and others from our church constituency. Dr Russell provided a fascinating day of training which covered:

  • Session 1: Explaining the Significance criteria and methodology
  • Session 2: Using the Significance criteria and methodology
  • Session 3: Case study: Three versions of John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress; Assessing items from the APSC collection
  • Session 4: Assessing items from the APSC collection; summary

It was particularly touching to see some of the attendees were able to provide further providence information regarding some of the items in the collection.

APSC Official Launch (6th July 2015: 5.30pm-7pm)

While the Pentecostal Heritage Centre originally commenced in 2001 at Chester Hill, the renamed APSC was officially launched at its Parramatta location in a room which was built to museum expert specifications. It was wonderful to see around 150 people gather for this event. The launch program featured:

  • Australian Indigenous Acknowledgement of Country – Ps David Armstrong
  • Greeting – Dr Geoffrey Lee, State Member for Parramatta
  • Greeting – Councillor Andrew Wilson, Parramatta City Council
  • University Vision – Assoc Prof Stephen Fogarty, AC CEO
  • Thesis presentation and tribute to David Cartledge – Dr Mark Robinson
  • Preserving Pentecostal history – Rev Dr Harold Hunter
  • Official opening of APS Centre – Rev Dr Andrew Evans

Significance Assessment (7th and 8th July 2015: 9am-5pm)

Dr Russell then conducted a two-day significance assessment of the APSC collection. This was a vital step in progressing the vision of the APSC as she was able to provide us with detailed information about the significance of the collection and how best to proceed in the future. This was also an incredibly valuable experience to have one-on-one time with an expert in the field to ask questions, seek advice and gain insights regarding archival collection and preservation.

Besides preservation, the goal of the APSC is also to encourage inter-institutional research projects in Pentecostal scholarship which will benefit the wider community locally, nationally and internationally. We welcome donations of church archives, sermons, artefacts, denominational magazines, photographs and any other memorabilia. Let’s join together in preserving our Pentecostal and charismatic history!

Rev Assoc Prof Denise Austin

Australasian Pentecostal Studies Centre Director

 

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International Conference on Pentecostal Theology in the Marketplace

This year, Alphacrucis College is the location of two events which may be of interest to scholars of Pentecostalism.  The first of these is the 2nd meeting of the E21 scholars group, which is developing an academic track towards the E21 Jerusalem Conference in 2015.  The second  takes advantage of the fact that Em. Prof. Vinson Synan and Prof. Amos Yong of Regent University, Virginia Beach,  are present in Australia for the E21 conference. The International Conference on Pentecostal Theology in the Marketplace will convene from 11th -12th July 2013 at Alphacrucis College in Parramatta. In addition to the plenary papers delivered by Prof. Yong, parallel sessions will run on the Economics of Religious Behaviour in the Market Place (Prof. Paul Oslington, ACU), on Faith, Social Justice and disability (Dr. Shane Clifton, AC), Theological Perspectives on Business (Stephen Fogarty), and Pentecostalism in Education (Jim Twelves).

 

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This book is one in a series of ‘short histories’ by Cambridge University Press. The series will also include a short history of Pentecostalism, by seminal scholar Edith Blumhofer.  That history, however, is some little way off, and while this book – by Mark Hutchinson (University of Western Sydney) and John Wolffe (Open University) – seeks to avoid many of Blumhofer’s key interests, it remains an important ‘back story’ to the emergence of Pentecostalism. It offers an authoritative overview of the history of evangelicalism as a global movement, from its origins in Europe and North America in the first half of the eighteenth century to its present-day dynamic growth in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania. Starting with a definition of the movement within the context of the history of Protestantism, it follows the history of evangelicalism from its early North Atlantic revivals to the great expansion in the Victorian era, through to its fracturing and reorientation in response to the stresses of modernity and total war in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It describes the movement’s indigenization and expansion toward becoming a multicentered and diverse movement at home in the non-Western world that nevertheless retains continuity with its historic roots. The book concludes with an analysis of contemporary worldwide evangelicalism’s current trajectory and the movement’s adaptability to changing historical and geographical circumstances.

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